business

Unprepared for business disruption?

Submitted by admin on Thu, 12/18/2008 - 10:30

''Nearly two-thirds of respondents [CIO's] say their organizations are at risk from information- and technology-based disruption. Ranking highest among disruptive forces are potential shifts in customer expectations for better products or differentiated services enabled by information- and technology-based capabilities. Pressures may be arising from widespread use and acceptance of emerging products and services.

Social Media

Keeping up with rapidly changing times.

Submitted by admin on Sun, 03/09/2008 - 09:07

The open-source software movement developed because people had an "itch to scratch". One that "off-the-shelf" software did not support or was too costly to use. In the open source community people want to contribute, learn and share their knowledge and experience. They want to participate in a rich learning environment. They want to be able to get their work done and make a difference. We know from experience that these ideas work in a business environment.

How Social Media and Web 2.0 Work In Business

Submitted by admin on Wed, 02/20/2008 - 17:35

The following three posts have a wealth of information, ideas and tips for business managers and CIO's about social media, web 2.0, social networking, and online communities. The fact is, this stuff, social software has to be used to be fully appreciated. It takes time to grasp its power and usefulness. Workplace social software and communities need to be understood from both, a regular user view point and from an administrator (control) view point. You bet, this is work.

Social networking software gives business the blues.

Submitted by admin on Mon, 10/23/2006 - 16:20

Social Networking Software - Community Drivien Sites - Collaborative Tools

Creating communities, connecting people, sharing knowledge, capturing ideas, and spurring mashups scares the hell out of most organizations, businesses, and associations.

Integrating Open Source - Web 2.0 - Applications For Business

Submitted by admin on Thu, 04/06/2006 - 06:45

Great piece about today's software development process and some of the cool web 2.0 applications.. These applications, such as social networking, community software, ajax, predications markets - use application programming interfaces (API's) so they can exchange data back and forth. This is becoming the year of the open application program interface - API or the Hook.

Take a bite!

Submitted by admin on Thu, 05/19/2005 - 08:27

Funny how we all want to jump up and say that we are for change when deep inside we are all scared shitless of losing what we have or not getting want we want. Even businesses that are losing money, markets, people are too afraid to change. So businesses and people commit slow suicide and call it management.

Social Media

Who says Blogs have to be about Egos?

Submitted by drupaldev on Wed, 05/04/2005 - 11:26

In reference to Seth's discussion on ego, my partner Jim neglected to expand on our idea for using blogs as a communications/idea generating tool WITHIN companies.  I think the Blogs that Seth's referring to in his "ego" post are the ones that currently reside in the "Blogosphere" - the ones full of pontificating PR blow-hards, techy geeks and whining self analysing personal blogs among others.  What we see for Ideascape is bringing the blog INTERNAL, to the corporate atmosphere...creating int

Will You Still Respect Me In The Morning?

Submitted by admin on Fri, 04/22/2005 - 07:39

Don't you think it's interesting that we have books that directly tie corporate performance to employee morale? What gives? Did you ever read the Monk Story? A simple tale about treating people with respect.

"A monastery has fallen on hard times. It was once part of a great order which, as a result of religious persecution in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, lost all its branches. It was decimated to the extent that there were only five monks left in the mother house: the Abbot and four others, all of whom were over seventy. Clearly it was a dying order.

Deep in the woods surrounding the monastery was a little hut that the Rabbi from a nearby town occasionally used for a hermitage. One day, it occurred to the Abbot to visit the hermitage to see if the Rabbi could offer any advice that might save the monastery. The Rabbi welcomed the Abbot and commiserated. "I know how it is," he said, "the spirit has gone out of people. Almost no one comes to the synagogue anymore." So the old Rabbi and the old Abbot wept together, and they read parts of the Torah and spoke quietly of deep things.

The time came when the Abbot had to leave. They embraced. "It has been wonderful being with you," said the Abbot, "but I have failed in my purpose for coming. Have you no piece of advice that might save the monastery?" "No; I am sorry," the Rabbi responded, "I have no advice to give. The only thing I can tell you is that the Messiah is one of you."

When the other monks heard the Rabbi’s words, they wondered what possible significance they might have. "The Messiah is one of us? One of us, here, at the monastery? Do you suppose he meant the Abbot? Of course - it must be the Abbot, who has been our leader for so long. On the other hand, he might have meant Brother Thomas, who is undoubtedly a holy man. Certainly he couldn't have meant Brother Elrod - he's so crotchety. But then Elrod is very wise. Surely, he could not have meant Brother Phillip - he's too passive. ,But then, magically, he's always there when you need him. Of course he didn't mean me - yet supposing he did? Oh Lord, not me! I couldn't mean that much to you, could I?"

As they contemplated in this manner, the old monks began to treat each other with extraordinary respect, on the off chance that one of them might be the Messiah. And on the off off chance that each monk himself might be the Messiah, they began to treat themselves with extraordinary respect.

Because the forest in which it was situated was beautiful, people occasionally came to visit the monastery, to picnic or to wander along the old paths, most of which led to the dilapidated chapel. They sensed the aura of extraordinary respect that surrounded the five old monks, permeating the atmosphere. They began to come more frequently, bringing their friends, and their friends brought friends. Some of the younger men who came to visit began to engage in conversation with the monks. After a while, one asked if he might join. Then another, and another. Within a few years, the monastery became once again a thriving order, and - thanks to the Rabbi's gift - a vibrant, authentic community of light and love for the whole realm.

Author, M. Scott Peck

Simple idea! Treat people with respect. Now we have ample evidence that suggests that treating employees well pays dividends.

"Giving Employees What They Want: The Returns Are Huge" (reg req)

"David Sirota, co-author of The Enthusiastic Employee: How Companies Profit by Giving Workers What They Want (Wharton School Publishing), believes far too many managers stifle employee enthusiasm across the board by using bureaucratic or punitive techniques that should be reserved for a troublesome few."

Mr. Sirota studied 28 companies employing 920,000 people that lead to the following findings:

  •  14 of the 28 companies with high morale had a 16% increase vs. just 3% for low morale companies, Share prices in the respective industries was 6% overall,
  •  let employees take pride in their work - employees want a sense of achievement from work,
  •  treat fairly and respectfully - fair pay and benefits,
  •  camaraderie - to work as a team - giving people a say in how they do their jobs - they want to participate.

Sirota: "We are often asked how to motivate employees. Our response is, that's a silly question. The real question is: 'How do you keep management from destroying motivation?' When we look at the data we find that people coming to a new job are quite enthusiastic. Most of them are very happy to be there and looking forward to meeting their new coworkers. But as you study the data you find morale, or enthusiasm, declines precipitously after five or six months."

Einstein's Dreams, 14 APRIL 1905.

Submitted by admin on Tue, 04/05/2005 - 21:31

Suppose time is a circle, bending back on itself. The world repeats itself, precisely, endlessly. For the most part, people do not know they will live their lives over. Traders do not know that they will make the same bargain again and again. Politicians do not know that they will shout from the same lectern an infinite number of times in the cycles of time.